rhamphotheca

allcreatures:

Another owl, a Pygmy owl, which is the smallest of the European owls, buries itself in the snow in Oulu, Finland. The Pygmy owl was perching high in a pine tree before flying back to play in the snow.

Mr Peltomaki added: “The Pygmy owl was looking down intensively for about 30 seconds - obviously it heard a vole under the snow - then it very quickly dived in to the deep soft snow, very close to me. First its head was under the snow when it was looking for vole and it was almost completely covered. The whole hunting sequence lasted 15 seconds and the owl looked very satisfied when it flew off with a vole. I was thrilled to witness and capture this scene on camera.”

Picture: Jari Peltomaki/SOLENT

(via Owls by David Tipling and Jari Peltomaki - Telegraph)

rhamphotheca

allcreatures:

Another owl, a Pygmy owl, which is the smallest of the European owls, buries itself in the snow in Oulu, Finland. The Pygmy owl was perching high in a pine tree before flying back to play in the snow.

Mr Peltomaki added: “The Pygmy owl was looking down intensively for about 30 seconds - obviously it heard a vole under the snow - then it very quickly dived in to the deep soft snow, very close to me. First its head was under the snow when it was looking for vole and it was almost completely covered. The whole hunting sequence lasted 15 seconds and the owl looked very satisfied when it flew off with a vole. I was thrilled to witness and capture this scene on camera.”

Picture: Jari Peltomaki/SOLENT

(via Owls by David Tipling and Jari Peltomaki - Telegraph)

rhamphotheca

electricspacekoolaid:

Dian Fossey’s 82nd Birthday 

The leading authority of endangered gorillas would have turned 82 today (Jan 16) if it wasn’t for her untimely death in 1985. Dian Fossey worked in the tangled slopes of Rwanda studying mountain gorillas and developing a habituating process which was never done before. Louis Leakey sent her to the Congo in 1966 and began her conservation work by 1967 in Rwanda. She was the closest researcher to the gorillas than ever before. Her research camp was 9,000 feet up Mount Visoke and was her home and battleground for almost twenty years. She fought bravely for the lives of the mountain gorillas and put their safety and health before hers. She is an inspiration to all and to those who help save endangered animal lives.

Read her articles “The Imperiled Mountain Gorilla published in April 1981 and Making Friends With Mountain Gorillas published in January 1970.